Good Nutrition Advice

For a healthy body and mind

Tag: overeating

good nutrition advice

High Salt Intake: Overeating Fatty Food

good nutrition adviceHigh salt intake could lead to overeating fatty food.

Two studies published in the Journal of Nutrition and Chemical Senses confirm the relationship between high salt and high fat intake. The first study took 49 participants aged 18 – 54 and gave them tomato soup with four different fat concentrations and five different salt concentrations.

The researchers found that those who preferred and detected the lower-fat soups also favoured the option with no added salt, leading them to conclude that salt masks fat.

The second study consisted of 48 adults (18-54) who attended four lunches over a six-day period. The lunch was the same each time with different concentrations of salt and fat. The scientists found that the participants consumed up to 11% less energy when their lunches were low salt, high fat. However, they ate much more when the lunch was high fat, high salt.

Your body should have an inbuilt mechanism to tell you when it’s full but this mechanism is blocked when salt is added to food. If you struggle with overeating watch your salt intake. Eating out and convenience foods will be the most problematic as these foods tend to contain much more salt than you would naturally add at home.

The solution? Make as much of your food as possible so you know what goes in it.

References: Effects of Salt and Fat Combinations on Taste Preference and Perception

Why Tasty Foods Like French Fries Leave You Wanting More

Why Tasty Foods Like French Fries Leave You Wanting More

How processed foods change the brain’s ability to recognize fullness.

Eating high-fat, processed foods may stop the brain sensing fullness, leading to overeating, a new animal study reports.

The research was conducted at the University of Georgia, Washington State University and Binghamton University (Cooper et al., 2015).

They switched rats’ normal diet to a high fat diet and found that the new diet changes the populations of bacteria living in the gut and alters the signalling to the brain.

Consequently, the body doesn’t feel full and wants more food, which leads to obesity. Dr Krzysztof Czaja, the principal investigator on the study, explained:

“When we switch the rats to a high fat diet, it reorganizes brain circuits. The brain is changed by eating unbalanced foods. It induces inflammation in the brain regions responsible for feeding behavior. Those reorganized circuits and inflammation may alter satiety signalling.”

After a switch to an unbalanced diet, microbiota in the gut will change. Dr. Czaja said:

“In the regular physiological state, many different strains of bacteria live in a balanced environment in the intestinal tract. They don’t overpopulate. There are little shifts, but in general this population is quite stable.

When we start feeding the rats a different diet, there is an immediate effect. Suddenly, different nutrients are changing the micro-environment in the gut and some bacteria begin to overpopulate.

Some sensitive bacteria begin to die and some populations may even vanish. So, introducing a significant change in the gut micro-environment triggers a cascade of events that leads to this population switch.”

Why Tasty Foods Like French Fries Leave You Wanting More

These changes lead to gut-brain miscommunication which happens when nerve cells that carry signals from the gut to the brain are inflamed and damaged.

Whether or not the change is reversible or permanent is a question that Dr Czaja and his colleagues will address in the future.

The body is accustomed to foods sourced naturally and so highly processed and artificial foods are new to our bodies.

This research shows how the introduction of modified foods high in fat and sugar can disturb intestinal microbiota and gut-brain communication which can result in obesity.

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