Good Nutrition Advice

For a healthy body and mind

Tag: diet

This Simple solution beats heart disease

This Simple Solution Beats Heart Disease

Fiona Wilkinson.

You can make a difference to your cholesterol levels and risk of heart disease by changing your lifestyle. This simple solution beats heart disease…

A large study published in the European Heart Journal analysed data from almost 9,000 men and women, aged 25–74, from Northern Sweden to understand the effects of making lifestyle changes on heart disease. Over a 10-year period (1994 to 2014) blood cholesterol dropped from 6.2 to 5.5 mmol/L.

Cholesterol-lowering drugs only contributed to a third of this reduction so it is believed that the rest can be attributed to lifestyle changes such as diet; lower fat intake and increased fibre from fruit, vegetables and grains. An encouraging finding from this study is that those who showed the most improvement initially were the most at risk (e.g. with diabetes and previous history of heart disease).

Limit fat from animal sources apart from oily fish, include heart-healthy plant oils such as olive oil, increase your fibre intake by ensuring that you have a minimum of 5-a-day every day and enjoy wholegrains such as brown rice, oats and quinoa in your diet.

References:

European Heart Journal: Greater decreases in cholesterol levels among individuals with high cardiovascular risk than among the general population: the northern Sweden MONICA study 1994 to 2014


Fiona WilkinsonAbout Fiona

I am a Nutrition and Behavioural Psychologist with an MSc in Clinical Nutrition and a PhD in Mental Health. I specialise in long-term weight loss, disordered eating and binge eating. I run both online and in-person programmes to help you with any weight or eating issues you may have picked up over the years. We’re all different and have different needs so I work very much with you as an individual and together we’ll work out a programme to fit you.

Healthy Weight Loss

Read more about me here…

 

How to Not Get Sick This Winter

How to not get sick this winter

How to not get sick this winter

Learn how you can beat the cold weather blues and support your body through the tough winter months — because better nutritional support can help give you better general health for stronger immunity.

Book a pre-winter vitamin and mineral analysis before the end of October and as a bonus get a 10% saving off your online consultation.

After you have filled out the forms you will receive very specific and personal recommendations for your diet, lifestyle and supplement programme. The aim is not only to help you improve your immune function so that you stay healthy throughout the winter, but also to address any other niggling health challenges you may be facing.

These could be to do with your energy levels, hormones, weight, fertility, blood pressure, cholesterol… or even more serious problems.

There are limited appointments for this special Winter offer which ends on 30th October 2014 so contact me today to confirm your consultation and you get your individual discounted link.

Thank you!
Fiona

Natural Choices

Natural CoursesIf you’re interested in Natural Health you’ll love Natural Choices. This online course in Natural Health, Nutrition, Psychology and Food Choices, will help kick start your healthy living plan.

There are 18 modules you can go through in your own time. This course is a unique and potentially life-changing learning experience giving you constant access to 100s of tips and health suggestions that you can easily incorporate in your life to make a difference!

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Tips to Stay Healthy as You Get Older

cabbageA 16-YEAR study of 5,100 British people aged between 42-63 has found that people who have healthy lifestyles in mid-life will stay healthy in old age.

Investigators observed that participants who engage in all four of these healthy behaviours had 3.3 times the odds of healthy ageing:

  • Not smoking
  • Moderate alcohol consumption
  • Taking exercise
  • Eating fruit and vegetables every day

The authors concluded: “Although individual healthy behaviours are moderately associated with successful aging, their combined impact is substantial. Multiple healthy behaviours appear to increase the chance of reaching old age disease-free and fully functional.”

Source: Canadian Medical Journal http://www.cmaj.ca/content/early/2012/10/22/cmaj.121080.abstract?sid=c380f4d2-94ae-4a24-964c-4c0e1205ba69

Here are some more tips for healthy aging:

  • Get out in the sun to boost your Vitamin D (this is especially important for older people). To get your vitamin D level checked and find out how much you need, you can order a simple finger prick test.
  • Don’t eat too much sugar and unrefined carbohydrates – they speed up the ageing process
  • Eat leafy green vegetables, whole grains, nuts and seeds – they contain calcium and magnesium that help you sleep
  • Keep your brain fit and Take a look with reading, puzzles, games, learning and hobbies
  • Stay physically active

If you have friends or family who are interested in health and nutrition please do forward this to them using the Social Media buttons below.

Do you have a health challenge that you’d like to discuss with me? I offer online Naturopathic and Nutrition Consultations. Fill out my forms here to book your personal consultation with me.

Thank you!
Fiona

Natural Choices

Natural CoursesIf you’re interested in Natural Health you’ll love Natural Choices. This online course in Natural Health, Nutrition, Psychology and Food Choices, will help kick start your healthy living plan.

There are 18 modules you can go through in your own time. This course is a unique and potentially life-changing learning experience giving you constant access to 100s of tips and health suggestions that you can easily incorporate in your life to make a difference!

GuaranteeSmallI can thoroughly recommend it! You can download it right away

Why high cholesterol foods are good for you

ShellfishCHOLESTEROL is a type of fat that exists in all our cell membranes. It is vital for functions such as nerve transmission, the formation of vitamin D and the formation of bile. Approximately 80 percent of cholesterol is produced in your liver, with the other 20 percent coming from diet.

Cholesterol is only found in animal products and not in vegetable oils such as avocado or olive. Shellfish, for example, contain very little fat, but high levels of cholesterol, while nut butters are high in fat and low in cholesterol.

Cholesterol myths

From recent research we now know the cholesterol in the food we eat is not a problem and has very little impact on your cholesterol levels. In fact, why high cholesterol foods are good for you is because the less cholesterol you get from foods, the more your body makes. Your body makes around one to two grams of cholesterol every day, which is five to ten times the cholesterol found in one egg.

When you eat more cholesterol from foods such as shellfish or eggs, your body produces less of it. The less cholesterol you eat – the more your body makes.

Cholesterol has to travel in the bloodstream and, in order to do so, is combined with a protein to create a lipoprotein, of which there are two main types: LDL – sometimes call ‘bad’, which carry cholesterol to the artery wall, and HDL – often called ‘good’, which helps to return cholesterol to the liver. High LDL causes damaged and inflamed arterial walls, also depositing saturated fats and calcium, called arterial plaque or atheroma. The balance of these two lipoproteins in the blood is more important that the total cholesterol.

High blood pressure link to vitamin D

DCF 1.0VITAMIN D deficiency may be associated with high blood pressure, according to research published on TheHeart.org. The study followed 112 people with high blood pressure who had their vitamin D levels checked.

Ninety-two of them were deficient at the start of the study. Giving the participants vitamin D supplements over 20 weeks showed a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure (the top number for blood pressure) (reduced by 6.8 mmHg) and also diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number) was reduced by 1.7mmHg.

How can you reduce high blood pressure?

  • Get your vitamin D level checked by a simple home finger prick test.
  • Supplement with vitamin D if you are deficient and then re-test to make sure the level is back to normal
  • Eat more oily fish and eggs as they contain vitamin D
  • Get out in the sunshine whenever possible (without wearing sunscreen)
  • Reduce your salt intake and use herbs such as ginger and garlic to flavour your food instead.
  • Follow a healthy eating programme (contact me for details), because being overweight – especially when carrying the weight around the middle of your body – increases your risk of high blood pressure.

Source: TheHeart.org http://www.theheart.org/conferences/esh/2012.do

Tamex H, Thadhani RI, 2012, Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens, 21, 5, 492-9 and Larsen T, 2012, presented at the European Society of Hypertension, London

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