Good Nutrition Advice

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Tag: cardiovascular disease

Eating Apples May Help Prevent Heart Disease

Eating Apples May Help Prevent Heart Disease

An Apple a Day Keeps the Cardiologist Away!

Munching on a Granny Smith or a Golden Delicious or two every day could cut your risk of heart disease and stroke by up to 40%!  And you only need to eat 150g — an apple and a half — to get the maximum benefits.

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and stroke are the leading causes of death worldwide, but eating antioxidant-rich fruit and vegetables help combat harmful but naturally occurring free radicals which may contribute to heart disease.

The study included 451,681 participants without CVD and who were not taking medication for high blood pressure. Some 18% of participants consumed fruit daily and 6.3% never ate any.

The average amount of fruit eaten by the daily consumers was 1.5 portions, around 150g in weight. The researchers found that compared to people who never ate fruit, those who ate fruit daily cut their CVD risks by 25-40%.  As the frequency of fruit consumption went up, the risk of CVD went down. The researchers also found that people who consumed fruit more often had significantly lower blood pressure (BP).

The findings were presented at the European Society of Cardiology meeting in Barcelona, Spain, in September.

 

Fish Roe is Best Source of Omega-3

Fish roe best source of omega-3

Fish roe best source of omega-3

Did you know? A tablespoon of caviar has as much omega-3 fat as a 1,000 mg of fish oil?

But before you go rushing out and spending all your hard earned cash on this pricy delicacy, it is worth remembering the cheaper lump fish versions work just as well.

The roe from hake, lumpfish and salmon contains the highest levels of omega-3 fatty acids according to research published in the European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology.

The study found minimal consumption of lumpfish, hake or salmon roe provides the body’s daily requirements for omega-3 due to their high levels of EPA and HDA.

A lack of omega-3 has been linked to cardiovascular disease, depression, hypertension, diabetes and inflammatory diseases such as Crohn’s.

Lumpfish is a great topping for  salads, sandwiches or a baked potato.

Walnuts: omega 3 and heart disease

walnuts

Walnuts contain good levels of omega 3

YES, I’m going nuts again …! This time it’s walnuts and they’re getting more good press. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition shows that eating whole walnuts and using walnut oil as a salad dressing reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Senior author Penny Kris-Etherton, Distinguished Professor of Nutrition at Penn State, stated that although we already know that eating walnuts as part of a heart-healthy diet can lower blood cholesterol levels, we didn’t know which component of the walnut was providing this benefit. The research pointed to the alpha-linolenic acid, gamma-tocopherol and phytosterols in walnuts.

Alpha-linolenic acid is an omega-3 fatty acid found in plants. Gamma-tocopherol is a major form of vitamin E found in many plant seeds, and phytosterols are compounds found in plants that can lower cholesterol levels.

Walnuts, depression and omega 3

Walnuts contain more omega 3 than any other nut. Apart from lowering triglyceride levels, omega 3 is particularly important for the brain to function properly. Other studies have shown that eating more omega 3, either from walnuts or fish, can significantly lower depression. Many people who suffer from depression have low levels of omega 3 in their bodies. Several other studies have also linked omega 3 deficiency in children with ADHD.

The FDA has also recognised the benefits of eating nuts to control heart disease. Nuts that contain less than 4g of saturated fat per 50g include walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts, almonds, pistachios, peanuts and some pine nuts. A study in 2009 published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed those who ate walnuts had a significantly higher decrease in total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol. The study also showed that walnuts provided good levels of antioxidant protection with no adverse effects on body weight.

A handful of walnuts provide 2.5g of ALA, the plant-based source of omega 3, 4g protein, 2g fiber and 10% of the daily recommended allowance of magnesium and phosphorus.

Ref: http://jn.nutrition.org/content/early/2013/04/24/jn.112.170993.abstract

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