good nutrition adviceHigh salt intake could lead to overeating fatty food.

Two studies published in the Journal of Nutrition and Chemical Senses confirm the relationship between high salt and high fat intake. The first study took 49 participants aged 18 – 54 and gave them tomato soup with four different fat concentrations and five different salt concentrations.

The researchers found that those who preferred and detected the lower-fat soups also favoured the option with no added salt, leading them to conclude that salt masks fat.

The second study consisted of 48 adults (18-54) who attended four lunches over a six-day period. The lunch was the same each time with different concentrations of salt and fat. The scientists found that the participants consumed up to 11% less energy when their lunches were low salt, high fat. However, they ate much more when the lunch was high fat, high salt.

Your body should have an inbuilt mechanism to tell you when it’s full but this mechanism is blocked when salt is added to food. If you struggle with overeating watch your salt intake. Eating out and convenience foods will be the most problematic as these foods tend to contain much more salt than you would naturally add at home.

The solution? Make as much of your food as possible so you know what goes in it.

References: Effects of Salt and Fat Combinations on Taste Preference and Perception